Apron with a pattern of “thymiata” from Soufli, Thrace. Early 20th c.

© Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

"Paouni", ornament for the headdress.

Soufli, Thrace. Early 20th century

© Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

Bridal or festive costume of Soufli, Thrace

Early 20th century

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

Newlyweds from Stefanoviki, Magnesia, Thessaly.

Early 20th century

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

Postcard of a woman wearing the Stefanoviki costume in the early twentieth century.

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

Bridal costume of Stefanoviki, Magnesia, Thessaly

Early 20th century

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

The bridal and festive costume of Stefanoviki was the customary dress of nearly all the villages of eastern Thessaly, with variations from place to place. It consists of a dark chemise, a shift (the anderí) and the kondándero (a kind of quilted anderí made of taraklí). Round the waist is a gold-embroidered belt (zonári), fastened over the apron with either the bridal buckle or the less elaborate thilykotária. The material of the apron matches the sleeve lining of the kondándero. The sleeveless velvet overcoat is called the katifés. The head is covered with a round cap (féssi) encircled by an improvised frontlet adorned with gold coins. Brides from poor families would hire this frontlet, the kafássi, from the local large landowner. The kerchief is made of purple silk. The jewellery worn with the costume comprises a silver belt, a double kioustéki, a souyás, parádes (gold coins), a bracelet and a haimalí (amulet)

Photo of a married woman wearing the costume of Gidas, Imathia, Macedonia

Early 20th century

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

A woman wearing the bridal costume of Gidas, Imathia, Macedonia, in the Panathenaic Stadium, Athens.

Photo: Nelly’s. Late 1930s

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

Bridal costume of Alexandria (Yidas), Imathia, Macedonia

Early 20th century

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

This bridal costume was worn in about fifty villages in the plain of Yannitsa, an area then called Roumlouki, where Yidás (now Alexandria) is the most important village . The bridal headdress looks like a helmet and is called katsoúli me tis foúndes: the katsoúli is the hard, egg-shaped part of the headdress, held in place on the crown of the head by a lock of hair taken from married women, and it was never taken off even in bed. Wrapped round the katsoúli are the three kerchiefs of the headdress, one black and two white. One of the white kerchiefs hangs down the back of the neck and is called the peristéra (dove). A good bridal katsoúli also has a pair of foúndes (tassels). The hair is cut in a fringe. 

Photo of women, men and kanakares (firstborn girls) of Karpathos, Dodecanese, wearing local costumes.

Early 20th century

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

Women’s costume of Elymbos, Karpathos, Dodecanese

Early 20th century

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

Woman from Kastelorizo,Dodecanese, hand-painted photo by Emile Lester 

c.1930

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

Bridal or festive costume of Kastelorizo, Dodecanese

Late 19th century

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

Peter von Hess, Bobolina [Bouboulina] Blockades Nauplia, tinted lithograph, 28x21 cm. From the album “Befreiung Griechenlands in XXXIX Bildern entworfen von Peter Hess”

© The Benaki Museum, Athens, Greece. All Rights reserved

Laskarina Bouboulina (1711-1825), a native of Spetses and a legendary figure of the Greek War of Independence, was portrayed in a lithograph by Peter von Hess (1792-1871) dressed in the costume of Spetses during the blockade of Nafplion in the summer of 1821

Women’s costume of Spetses, Argosaronic Islands

Early 20th century

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

The costumes of Spetses, Hydra and the Ermionida region generally used to have a pleated green dress with a crimson velvet hem and a zipoúni of brocade imported from Western Europe or the East. Later, the dress of the Spetses costume was replaced by one made in the fashion of the day, while still retaining the everyday or festive headscarf (piétes), which might or might not be embroidered, or the tsembéri, which was carefully arranged on the head and held in place with special brooches: the márka, kofináki, heráki and others. Eventually the zipoúni – which was much the same as the zipoúni used in the ‘Amalia’ costume – was abandoned.